29 8 / 2014

Gail Simone’s two-‘issue’ arc (it’s two-thirds of the print version of issue 1, sooo….) is probably the best thing she’s done since Secret Six.  Without spoiling anything, the issue serves as something of a critique of recent attitudes toward the Gotham rogues’ gallery, as opposed to the more sympathetic/tragic takes on the characters present during the revisionist ’90s.  Snyder’s been really on a track to make everyone as nasty as possible—see the new take on Freeze.  In fact, upon reading it I went so far as to call it both a fuck you to Batman and to ‘Why doesn’t Batman just kill the Joker.’  Read it.

Gail Simone’s two-‘issue’ arc (it’s two-thirds of the print version of issue 1, sooo….) is probably the best thing she’s done since Secret Six.  Without spoiling anything, the issue serves as something of a critique of recent attitudes toward the Gotham rogues’ gallery, as opposed to the more sympathetic/tragic takes on the characters present during the revisionist ’90s.  Snyder’s been really on a track to make everyone as nasty as possible—see the new take on Freeze.  In fact, upon reading it I went so far as to call it both a fuck you to Batman and to ‘Why doesn’t Batman just kill the Joker.’  Read it.

27 8 / 2014

You want context?  Well, you don’t get context!
—Saga #22

You want context?  Well, you don’t get context!

Saga #22

27 8 / 2014

Quoth a good friend of mine: “Dark Willow was right”

27 8 / 2014

Listening to Cop by Swans.  It’s like being electrocuted in a pitch-dark room and I’m actually totally in the mood for it.

25 8 / 2014

In Angel and Faith #1 (not the current season, but the past one), which I’m just reading now, there’s a flashback scene of Giles exorcising a demon.  The artist draws him in a beige trenchcoat, white shirt, black tie, and black sweater-vest.  In other words, he’s John Constantine in a sweater-vest and glasses.  Which, when you think about it, is exactly what Rupert Giles is.  Well done, Rebekah Isaacs.

22 8 / 2014

I’ve been reading a biography of Leadbelly and his story once he gets big is absolutely fascinating/depressing.  Like, John Lomax, the folklorist who helps him get released from prison, is interested in this archetype of the southern black folksinger, and won’t let him play a lot of the material from other traditions he used to play all the time in Texas because it’s not ‘authentic’ enough.  Meanwhile, during this time, all the papers want to talk about is that guys did you hear he stabbed a guy and did time how scary is that let’s use the word homicidal in like every damn headline about him. (Leadbelly himself, meanwhile, thinks of himself as a performer and a professional) Once he gets rid of Lomax, he flounders for awhile trying to find an audience—black audiences think his work is out-of-date, which, given that he’s playing stuff he played a decade or two ago in Texas, is not inaccurate.  So his next big break comes among the, again, mostly white leftist folkie crowd—Woody Guthrie and so on—and now radical papers are presenting him as this downtrodden hero who broke free of prison and his capitalist manager (Lomax), when again, Leadbelly thinks of himself as a professional musician first and foremost.  It’s a distressingly modern picture in a lot of ways.

13 8 / 2014

11 8 / 2014

Greg Carpenter is so good guys.

04 8 / 2014

From JLA: The Obsidian Age, by Joe Kelly (writing) and Doug Mahnke (art).  Always did like Kelly’s Major Disaster—total jerk, but so much fun to read.

From JLA: The Obsidian Age, by Joe Kelly (writing) and Doug Mahnke (art).  Always did like Kelly’s Major Disaster—total jerk, but so much fun to read.

25 7 / 2014

From Zombo by Al Ewing.
If you can stomach a bit of the ultraviolence, it’s a screamingly funny comic.

From Zombo by Al Ewing.

If you can stomach a bit of the ultraviolence, it’s a screamingly funny comic.